Burkhart von Hohenfels


Burkhart von Hohenfels
(early 13th century)
   This poet is mentioned in numerous historical documents between 1212 and 1242 as a member of a south German family of lower nobility (ministeriales) from the area of Lake Constance. He seems to have been in the service of Emperor Frederick II (1216) first and then of King Henry VII between 1222 and 1228. The famous manuscript Grosse Heidelberger Liederhandschrift (Manessische Liederhandschrift) contains a fictional portrait of the poet (fol. 110r) who is conversing with a courtly lady and passes a manuscript scroll to her. Burkhart composed 18 COURTLY LOVE songs that are characterized by highly unusual imagery and motifs derived from hunting, falconry, bird-snaring, bestiary, warfare, and feudalism. In four dance songs the poet specifically reflects the influence of NEIDHART by adapting and also modifying the summer and winter motifs. But Burkhart does not allow the peasant theme to enter his poetry, as Neidhart does. The experience of winter only means that the courtly dance has to take place indoors (song no. I). If birds could properly perceive the beauty and virtues of his lady, they would declare her the mistress of the entire summer (no. III). In no. V, the poet describes his symbolic attempt to escape the snares of love by fleeing into a foreign country because his lady denies him her favor, but then he consigns himself to the noble power of her virtues and courtly honor. Burkhart here also envisions what he would do if he were a woman and were wooed by a lover, namely, open his heart and give the gift of love to him. As Neidhart does, the poet also has two young women discuss with each other the meaning of love in its social context (no. VII), but again without Neidhart’s aggressive and satirical tone.
   Burkhart obviously enjoyed developing innovative nature images to reflect upon love (no. XI), and he also created a remarkable woman’s song (no. XIII) where the female voice ponders how she can pursue a virtuous life and at the same time follow her heart’s desires. In no. XII the poet describes the effect of love in terms of personal bondage (“nu bin ich eigen,” 4, 5). His lady’s love is so powerful that it chases all other thoughts out of his heart, but if only once he could be allowed to enter her heart chamber, all his worries and doubts would disappear (no. XVI). Subsequently Burkhart describes his innermost feelings of love as a desire to enter a feudal contract with his lady (no. XVII). Finally, the poet states that no falcon returned faster to his master than his thoughts of love would fly to his lady (no. XVIII).
   Bibliography
   ■ Goldin, Frederick, ed. and trans. German and Italian Lyrics of the Middle Ages: An Anthology and History. Garden City, N.Y.: Anchor Press, 1973.
   ■ Kornrumpf, Gisela, ed. Texte, 2nd ed. Vol. 1, Deutsche Liederdichter des 13 Jahrhunderts, edited by Carl von Kraus, 33–51. Tübïngen, Germany: Niemeyer, 1978.
   ■ Sayce, Olive. The Medieval German Lyric 11501300: The Development of Its Themes and Forms in Their European Context. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1982, 299–302.
   ■ Worstbrock, Franz Joseph. “Verdeckte Schichten und Typen im deutschen Minnesang um 1210–1230.” In Fragen der Liedinterpretation, edited by Hedda Ragotzky, Gisela Vollmann-Profe, and Gerhard Wolf, 75–90. Stuttgart, Germany: S. Hirzel, 2001.
   Albrecht Classen

Encyclopedia of medieval literature. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Burkhart von Hohenfels — Burkhart von Hohenfels,   Minnesänger, 1212 42 urkundlich bezeugt, staufische Ministeriale aus dem Bodenseegebiet; dichtete in späthöfischem Stil, doch mit eigenen kräftigen Bildern; er war wie Gottfried von Neifen und Ulrich von Winterstetten… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Burchard von Hohenfels — Burkart von Hohenfels (Miniatur im Codex Manesse, Zürich, Anfang 14. Jahrhundert) Burk(h)art von Hohenfels war ein Minnesänger. Über seine Lebensumstände ist wenig bekannt. Leben Die Herren von Hohenfels waren vermutlich Ministerialen des… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Burkhard von Hohenfels — Burkart von Hohenfels (Miniatur im Codex Manesse, Zürich, Anfang 14. Jahrhundert) Burk(h)art von Hohenfels war ein Minnesänger. Über seine Lebensumstände ist wenig bekannt. Leben Die Herren von Hohenfels waren vermutlich Ministerialen des… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Burkart von Hohenfels — (Miniatur im Codex Manesse, Zürich, Anfang 14. Jahrhundert) Burk(h)art von Hohenfels war ein Minnesänger. Über seine Lebensumstände ist wenig bekannt. Leben Die Herren von Hohenfels waren vermutlich Ministerialen des Bischofs von Konstanz und… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Ulrich von Winterstetten — Ulrich von Wịnterstetten,   mittelhochdeutscher Dichter des 13. Jahrhunderts; Minnesänger aus oberschwäbischem Ministerialengeschlecht, als (Reichs )Schenk von Schmalnegg Winterstetten zwischen 1241 und 1280 urkundlich bezeugt, zunächst in… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Буркарт фон Хоенфельс — В Википедии есть статьи о других людях с такой фамилией, см. Буркарт. Буркарт фон Хоенфельс Burkart von Hohenfels …   Википедия

  • Liste der Literaturmuseen — Ein Literaturmuseum sammelt, pflegt und präsentiert Zeugnisse über Autoren des literarischen Lebens, literarische Themen bzw. literarische Produktionen. Oft befinden sich derartige Museen in der ehemaligen Lebens und Wirkungsstätte eines Autors,… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Liste internationaler Literaturmuseen — Ein Literaturmuseum sammelt, pflegt und präsentiert Zeugnisse über Autoren des literarischen Lebens, literarische Themen bzw. literarische Produktionen. Oft befinden sich derartige Museen in der ehemaligen Lebens und Wirkungsstätte eines Autors,… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Minnesinger — (Minnesänger) werden, mit besonderer Hervorhebung des von ihnen vorzugsweise behandelten poetischen Stoffes, die deutschen Lyriker des 12. und 13. Jahrh. in ihrer Gesamtheit genannt. Eigentlich lyrische Dichtungen treten in Deutschland erst in… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Minnesang — Mịn|ne|sang 〈m.; s; unz.; im MA〉 höfische Liebeslyrik * * * Mịn|ne|sang, der [mhd. minnesanc] (Literaturwiss.): höfische Liebeslyrik. * * * Minnesang,   im eigentlichen Sinne die mittelhochdeutsche Liebeslyrik (Minnelyrik); manchmal werden auch …   Universal-Lexikon


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.